The History Of Literature

Informações:

Synopsis

Enthusiast Jacke Wilson journeys through the history of literature, from ancient epics to contemporary classics.Find out more at historyofliterature.com and facebook.com/historyofliterature.

Episodes

  • 418 "Because I could not stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson

    20/06/2022 Duration: 57min

    Because Jacke could not stop for the scheduled episode topics, a certain poem kindly stopped for him. Luckily it's one of the greatest poems of all time! It's by the 19th-century American genius Emily Dickinson, and it packs into seven short stanzas a journey through life, death, and the cosmos. Read a copy of the poem here: Because I could not stop for Death - (479) Additional listening suggestions: 120 Astonishing Emily Dickinson Shakespeare's Greatest Sonnets | Sonnet 29 ("When in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes") 379 Gwendolyn Brooks Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 417 What Happened on Roanoke Island? (with Kimberly Brock)

    16/06/2022 Duration: 54min

    It's one of the great mysteries in American history. The "lost colony" of Roanoke Island, where 120 or so men, women, and children living in the first permanent English settlement in North America simply disappeared, leaving behind nothing but a mysterious word carved into a tree trunk. While historians remain baffled, speculation has run rampant, with everything from massacre to relocation to space alien abduction taking their turns as potential theories. What happened to those people? And is there any way to tell their story? In this episode, Jacke talks to author Kimberly Brock about her novel The Lost Book of Eleanor Dare, which extends the mystery of Roanoke and its legacy from the late seventeenth century to the mid-twentieth. Additional listening suggestions: 351 Mary Wollstonecraft (with Samantha Silva) 382 Forbidden Victorian Love (with Mimi Matthews) 99 History and Mystery (with Radha Vatsal) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literat

  • 416 William Blake vs the World (with John Higgs)

    13/06/2022 Duration: 56min

    In his lifetime, the Romantic poet and engraver William Blake (1757-1827) was barely known and frequently misunderstood. Today, his genius is widely celebrated and his poems are some of the most famous in the English language - and yet we still struggle to comprehend his unique way of seeing the world. In this episode, Blakean biographer John Higgs, author of the new book William Blake vs. the World, joins Jacke to discuss Blake's life, art, and visions. Additional listening suggestions: William Blake 306 John Keats's Great Odes (with Anahid Nersessian) 58 Wyndham Lewis and the Vorticists (with Professor Paul Peppis) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 415 "Goblin Market" by Christina Rossetti

    09/06/2022 Duration: 01h24min

    As a devout and passionate religious observer, Victorian poet Christina Rossetti (1830-1894) lived a life that might seem, at first glance, as proper and tame. Even some of her greatest works, devotional poems and verses for children, strike us as just the kind of art a fine upstanding moralist might generate. But there was more to Christina Rossetti than that - and in fact, she produced some of the most passionate and idiosyncratic poems of her era. In this episode, Jacke takes a look at her long narrative poem Goblin Market (1859-1862), about two sisters seduced by the fruits being sold by a pack of river goblins, which is one of the most sensationally bizarre poems Jacke has ever read. Additional listening suggestions: 95 The Runaway Poets - The Triumphant Love Story of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning 130 The Poet and the Painter - The Great Love Affair of Anna Akhmatova and Amedeo Modigliani 382 Forbidden Victorian Love (with Mimi Matthews) Help support the show at patreon.com/literatu

  • 414 Henry James's Golden Bowl (with Dinitia Smith) | William Blake Preview (with John Higgs)

    06/06/2022 Duration: 01h02min

    Money. Sex. Power. Family. Those are the conceits at the heart of Henry James's late-period masterpiece, The Golden Bowl. In this episode, Jacke talks to author Dinitia Smith, whose new novel The Prince reinvigorates this classic story of a wealthy American widower, his doting daughter, her charismatic foreign husband, and the childhood friend whose secret love affairs threaten to jeopardize multiple marriages. Additional listening suggestions: 340 Forgotten Women of Literature 5 - Constance Fenimore Woolson 341 Constance and Henry - The Story of "Miss Grief" 343 The Feast in the Jungle 344 Crouching Tiger, Hidden Beast 346 For Whom the Beast Leaps Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 413 Walt Whitman - "Song of Myself"

    02/06/2022 Duration: 01h04min

    In this episode, we resume our look at Walt Whitman's life and body of work, focusing in particular on the years 1840-1855. Did Whitman's teaching career end with him being tarred and feathered by an angry mob, as has long been rumored? What happened during his three months in New Orleans? And how did this printer and hack writer wind up writing the twelve poems in Leaves of Grass (1855), thereby becoming the "true poet" that Ralph Waldo Emerson had been searching for? Additional listening ideas: 411 Walt Whitman - A New Hope 84 The Trials of Oscar Wilde 296 Nathaniel Hawthorne Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 412 HOL Goes to War (with Elizabeth Samet, Matt Gallagher, and Tom Roston)

    30/05/2022 Duration: 01h02min

    In this best-of History of Literature episode, Jacke revisits the topic of war and literature with three guests: Professor Elizabeth Samet (Soldier's Heart: Reading Literature Through Peace and War at West Point), who teaches literature to military officers in training; Matt Gallagher (Empire City and Youngblood), a veteran who served in Iraq; and Tom Roston (The Writer's Crusade: Kurt Vonnegut and the Many Lives of Slaughterhouse-Five), who places Kurt Vonnegut's writing in the context of his POW experiences in WWII and his position as an antiwar prophet to the Vietnam generation. Full episodes are available at: 143 A Soldier's Heart (with Elizabeth Samet) Conflict Literature (with Matt Gallagher) 362 Kurt Vonnegut (with Tom Roston) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit me

  • 411 Walt Whitman - A New Hope

    26/05/2022 Duration: 01h03min

    In 1844, Ralph Waldo Emerson called for a new poet who would reflect the spirit and potential of America. In 1855, a then-unknown poet named Walt Whitman published Leaves of Grass, his attempt to fulfill Emerson's wish. In this episode, Jacke looks at Whitman's early life and career, contrasting Leaves of Grass with the works of a pair of poets that Emerson may have had in mind when he railed against "men of poetical talents...of industry and skill in meter" who nevertheless failed to be what Emerson called "true poets." Additional listening suggestions: 111 The Americanest American - Ralph Waldo Emerson 120 The Astonishing Emily Dickinson 410 What Is American Literature? (with Ilan Stavans) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 410 What Is American Literature? (with Ilan Stavans)

    23/05/2022 Duration: 58min

    America, America, America... a continent, a nation, a people, and a whole lotta books. But how does America define itself? Who defines it? Where did the idea of American exceptionalism come from? And how does literature fit into any of this? In this episode, Jacke talks to Professor Ilan Stavans about his new book, What Is American Literature? ILAN STAVANS is Lewis-Sebring Professor of Humanities and Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College, the publisher of Restless Books, and the host of the NPR podcast "In Contrast". The recipient of numerous international awards, his work, adapted into film, theatre, TV, and radio, has been translated into twenty languages.  Additional listening suggestions: Literary Battle Royale 2 - The Cold War (U.S. vs. U.S.S.R.) 120 The Astonishing Emily Dickinson 111 Ralph Waldo Emerson - The Americanest American Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Pod

  • 409 "Fear and Trembling" (The Story of Abraham and Isaac) by Soren Kierkegaard

    19/05/2022 Duration: 01h08min

    In our last look at Søren Kierkegaard, we left our hero after he had just left the love of his life, Regine Olsen, in favor of a life devoted to God and philosophy. In this episode, Jacke looks at one of the great products of that seismic schism: Fear and Trembling, or Kierkegaard's analysis of God's command that Abraham should sacrifice his beloved son Isaac. How does Abraham's decision fit into moral and ethical principles? And if it doesn't fit, what does that mean for our society - or for Christianity itself? Additional listening suggestions 405 Kierkegaard Falls in Love 6 Greek Tragedy - Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes 117 Machiavelli and The Prince Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 408 Dylan Thomas (with Scott Carter)

    16/05/2022 Duration: 59min

    Do not go gentle into this good episode! Rage, rage against the dying of the... well, things fall apart there, don't they? (Because we're not gifted poets like Dylan Thomas!) In this episode, Jacke talks to producer, playwright, and performer Scott Carter about his lifelong passion for the Welsh bard who took the U.K. by storm in the mid-twentieth-century and America by even stormier storm soon thereafter. Which poems are best? What's good about them? How did they feed into the mythic reputation of Dylan Thomas? And what does it all mean for us today? Additional listening ideas: T.S. Eliot and "The Waste Land" 325 Philip Larkin 396 Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes (with Heather Clark) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 407 "The Old Nurse's Story" by Elizabeth Gaskell

    12/05/2022 Duration: 01h37min

    Elizabeth Gaskell had only written one novel when Charles Dickens started publishing her work in his journal Household Words. But soon she would become famous as the author of Cranford and North and South, two of the best novels of the Victorian era. Dickens proved to be a generous and artist-friendly editor, offering suggestions but allowing Gaskell to have the final say over her work (with one exception). In this episode, Jacke looks at the ghost story that Dickens asked Gaskell to write, along with the alternative ending that Dickens first suggested and then wrote for her consideration. Additional listening ideas: Like Dickens? And Christmas ghost stories? Try our episode on Ebeneezer Scrooge (#293).. Mad about the Victorians? We talked about Middlemarch with Yang Huang in Episode 330 and Forbidden Victorian Love with Mimi Matthews in Episode 382.. Did you know that Mrs. Gaskell wrote a famous biography of Charlotte Brönte? We did our own deep dive into the Bröntes back in 2019. Help support the sho

  • 406 A World in Turmoil - 1967-1971 (with Beverly Gologorsky)

    09/05/2022 Duration: 56min

    Novelist Beverly Gologorsky joins Jacke for a discussion of the tumultuous years from 1967 to 1971, which provides the background for her new novel. In Can You See the Wind?, a working-class family in the Bronx struggles to make a better world, even as the world spins into chaos. Columbia professor (and friend of the podcast) Farah Jasmine Griffin says "Beverly Gologorsky brings a clarity of vision and purpose to this extraordinary novel—a story about the complexities and love that both bring families, lovers and comrades together and tears them apart. Can You See the Wind? renders the urgency of political movements as well as moments of individual contemplation. That she does so in breathtaking prose is a testament to her brilliance and artistry." Additional listening suggestions: Episode 358 - The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature (with Farah Jasmine Griffin) Episode 382 - Forbidden Victorian Love (with Mimi Matthews) Episode 158 - "The Things They Carried" by Tim O'Brien Help support the sh

  • 405 Kierkegaard Falls in Love

    05/05/2022 Duration: 01h04min

    The nineteenth-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) is well known as the father of existentialism and one of the great Christian thinkers of all time. But it is in his relationship with Regine Olsen - his love for her, their brief engagement, and the horrible breakup, in which he left her for a life devoted to the pursuit of knowledge - where we see his true literary gifts. In this episode, Jacke looks at Kierkegaard's life and writing, with a special focus on the agonizing relationship with a young woman that perhaps brought out his truest self. Additional listening suggestions: Episode 169 - Dostoevsky Episode 95 - The Runaway Poets - The Triumphant Love Story of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning HOL Episode on Albert Camus Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about

  • 404 Kafka and Literary Oblivion (with Robin Hemley)

    02/05/2022 Duration: 58min

    Author Robin Hemley joins Jacke for a discussion of Kafka, writerly ambition, and his new novel Oblivion: An After Autobiography, which tells the story of a midlist author who finds himself in the posthumous world where authors fade from obscurity into the world of Oblivion...unless they can manage to write their way out. Additional listening suggestions: Episode 349 - Kafka's Metamorphosis (with Blume) Episode 139 - A Hunger Artist by Franz Kafka Episode 134 - The Greatest Night of Franz Kafka's Life Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 403 The Wonderful World of Mysteries (A Best-of-HOL Episode)

    28/04/2022 Duration: 01h03min

    Mysteries! In this best-of episode, Jacke revisits conversations with three guests for three different angles on this popular and enduring literary genre. First, Jonah Lehrer (Mystery: A Seduction, A Strategy, A Solution) discusses what exactly makes mysteries so compelling. Then, novelist Christina Kovac, author of the mystery The Cutaway, joins Jacke for a discussion of setting a mystery in the world of television news. Gillian Gill, author of Agatha Christie: The Women and Her Mysteries, stops by next for a discussion of the Queen of Mystery and her mysterious disappearance. And finally, Jonah Lehrer returns for a discussion of mysteries as they play out in Hamlet, Harry Potter, and human beings. Enjoy! Additional listening ideas: Episode 350 - Mystery! (with Jonah Lehrer) Episode 109 - Women of Mystery (with Christina Kovac) The History of Literature Podcast - Agatha Christie (with Gillian Gill) Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature

  • Introducing "The History of Literature"

    26/04/2022 Duration: 03min

    Literature enthusiast Jacke Wilson journeys through the history of literature, from ancient epics to contemporary classics. Find out more at historyofliterature.com and facebook.com/historyofliterature. Support the show by visiting patreon.com/literature or paypal.me/jackewilson. New episodes every Monday and Thursday wherever you listen to podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • 402 "The Open Boat" by Stephen Crane

    25/04/2022 Duration: 01h14min

    After being given $700 in Spanish gold by some newspapers, a 25-year-old Stephen Crane set out for Florida, where he planned to travel by boat to Cuba and cover the impending Spanish-American War as a war correspondent. But the steamship he boarded capsized after hitting some sandbars, forcing Crane and 28 shipmates - most of them arms runners friendly to the Cuban insurrectionists - into lifeboats and head into the open sea. Crane was one of the last to leave, and he wound up sharing a dinghy with the ship's captain and two others. While he didn't get to cover the war, the story of the four men, who struggled for days to survive without being rescued, helped add to Crane's growing literary fame. In this episode, Jacke explores (and reads in its entirety) the classic Stephen Crane story of shipwreck, "The Open Boat." Additional listening suggestions: Episode 90 - Mark Twain's Final Request Episode 101 - Writers at Work Conflict Literature (with Matt Gallagher) Help support the show at patreon.com/literat

  • 401 HOL Presents: Melissa Chadburn and The Throwaways (A Storybound Project) | PLUS The First Work of Literature by an African American Author

    21/04/2022 Duration: 51min

    Jacke takes a look at the first work of literature by an African American author, courtesy of Fictions of America: The Book of Firsts by Uli Baer and Smaran Dayal. Then he turns things over to Storybound, a Podglomerate podcast, for a conversation with author Melissa Chadburn and excerpts from her essay "The Throwaways." Melissa Chadburn’s writing has appeared in The LA Times, NYT Book Review, NYRB, Longreads, Paris Review online, and dozens other places. Her essay on food insecurity was published in “Best American Food Writing 2019.” She’s done extensive reporting on the child welfare system and appears in the Netflix docuseries “The Trials of Gabriel Fernandez.” Her debut novel, A Tiny Upward Shove, is forthcoming with Farrar, Straus, & Giroux. She is a Ph.D. candidate at USC’s Creative Writing Program.  Storybound is a radio theater program designed for the podcast age. Storybound is hosted by Jude Brewer and brought to you by The Podglomerate and Lit Hub Radio. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit mega

  • 400 Anniversary Special! (with Mike Palindrome)

    18/04/2022 Duration: 01h12min

    Celebrating 400 episodes of The History of Literature, Jacke and Mike respond to a listener poll and choose the Top 10 Episodes We Must Do in the Future. Additional listening suggestions: Episode 83 - Overrated! Top 10 Books You Don't Need to Read Episode 149 - Raising Readers (aka the Power of Literature in an Imperfect World) Episode 92 - The Books of Our Lives Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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